Favorite Gene Kelly routines

Tired of hearing about Gene Kelly yet? Too bad. I never really get tired of talking about him, and I definitely don’t get tired of watching him dance. You probably haven’t seen it, but he’s featured in a new car commercial, along with Donald O’Conner. My brother and I (also a big fan) are excited about the commercial, just because any time somebody wants to remind the world of Gene Kelly and Donald O’Conner is just fine with us. However, Linda Holmes over at NPR’s Monkey See blog has a reasonable argument for disliking the ad. I do see the point, as I also think that the commercial is pretty tacky-looking.

In reading that blog post, in which she highlights various routines of Mr. Kelly’s, I got to thinking about my favorite numbers. And then I thought, “Hey! That’d be a great post.” And so here we are. In chronological order, the very best (according to me) Gene Kelly dancin’ (and singin’) moments. I’m sure I’ll hear some argument, since I prefer these to some of the more well-known appearances, but if you don’t like my picks, well, go get your own blog!

“For Me and My Gal” (For Me and My Gal, 1942)
This is Gene Kelly’s first movie. He was already well-established in New York, and like many performers, made his way West to break into movies. Unlike some others, though, he had a reasonably powerful ally in the person of Judy Garland. She helped him learn his way around the movie-making biz, and they would ultimately do three pictures together. In this number, Kelly already shows himself to be a star, easily sharing the screen with the famous Garland, and performing a really charming routine. Plus, how handsome is he here??

“On the Town” (On the Town, 1949)
What I like about this number is that it shows us that Kelly could be a team player. He was a notorious perfectionist, and he was supposedly very picky about his co-stars’ dancing abilities, but here, in a movie he co-directed, he doesn’t put himself forward in this ensemble piece. He shares equal time with co-stars Frank Sinatra, Jules Munshin, Ann Miller (Love her!!), Vera-Ellen, and Betty Garrett, and I think the result is perfect. Those harmonies! Sadly, the routine by itself is no longer available on Youtube. You’ll just have to enjoy the trailer instead.

Scene from Summer Stock, 1950
Summer Stock is the third and final collaboration between Gene Kelly and Judy Garland. This scene, in which Kelly incorporates a squeaky board and a newspaper into his dance, shows off Kelly’s innovative and inventive ideas, not to mention his talent. It’s a really nice little routine, subdued in comparison to the big show-stoppers, but no less impressive.

“I Got Rhythm” (An American in Paris, 1951)
I was already a pretty big fan of Kelly by the time I saw An American in Paris, but I was still blown away by the dancing in this routine. It’s pretty impressive, but what really makes this scene is Kelly’s interaction with the kids, and his ability to use big moves in close spaces. “Demain, le bubblegum pour tout!”

Embedding has been disabled, but you can check out the number HERE.

“Good Mornin'” (Singin’ in the Rain, 1952)
Yep. You didn’t think I’d leave it out, did you? The best movie musical (and the best movie, IMO) EVER. I know everyone loves the title number, but I seriously waffled between “Moses Supposes,” which you can see on the Monkey See post and “Good Mornin'”. I chose this one because of the fantastic way in which the three dancers (Kelly, Donald O’Connor, and Debbie Reynolds) maintain the personalities and relationships between their characters throughout, and because I love watching Reynolds hold her own against two of the greats. And again, Kelly’s inventive choreography, utilizing his space and surroundings to the utmost degree. Have you seen this movie yet? Are you tired of me asking? Get on it!!

Geez, I love musicals. And Gene Kelly. How about you? Do you have a favorite scene that I didn’t include?

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3 responses to “Favorite Gene Kelly routines

  1. Sorry Sam, as I haven’t seen a single one of GK musicals (yes, I know, I know), I can’t contribute to this post.

  2. My favourite dancer. Far superior to Fred Astaire, who’s spoken of as “the greatest dancer”. My opinion and obviously yours too!

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